Drone Photography Changes the Plane

There has been much talk and excitement about drones. The sentiment from the public ranges from indifference and curiosity to indignation and alarm. People who normally embrace emerging technologies will all of a sudden feel uneasy when confronted by an overhead drone. Safety issues, which ironically are  the most significant, aren't the reason. There seems to be something more primal at work, something more instinctual that creates a sense of insecurity. It's not about privacy, since we gladly post our most intimate details on social media. Is it just that being observed from the sky doesn't feel right? Is this the human equivalent of a hawk and a rodent?  You might say it's all in the eye of the beholder.

 

 

To the photographer or videographer operating the drone, having a flying camera lets you get shots you could never do before, even from an airplane or helicopter. 

 

 

The drone is a technological marvel, combining aeronautics, computing, and digital photography, with global positioning and wifi communication. The result is a sophisticated flying camera that can be used by anyone with a few extra bucks and an avid curiosity. The medium has opened new avenues to express every day realities, and the constantly changing environment.

 

 

The beauty of timely aerial photography is it provides a unique view of our activities and our collective footprint that is otherwise fleeting, and largely unobserved.

 

People gather to watch the sunset over Mission Bay

 


Comments


Archive
January February March April May (1) June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May (6) June (1) July August September October November December
January February March (1) April May June July August September October November December